3 Tips for Reiki Nurses

by | Nov 5, 2014 | 0 comments

Being a Reiki Nurse can be challenging. Why? Because although Reiki is making its way into mainstream trends; it still is not fully accepted by everyone in the medical community. Some folks are skeptical of Reiki Practice and see it is ‘woo-woo nonsense’. Others are afraid of things that they do not understand. Yet we as Reiki Nurses, believing in the modality and the benefits we see and feel from it know of the power of this beautiful complementary therapy.

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  1. We have to watch our language. While there is a very large group, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine that is part of NIH, even they are warning about the use of the terminology as is written about in this article. When I am presenting on Reiki Practice or teaching nurses Reiki I, I always suggest that we use the word ‘complementary’ with respect to Reiki. Reiki Practice is never to be done instead of conventional treatment. It is given in addition to- in order to complement what is already being done.
  2. We have to speak to the benefits. If we begin to use medical, theoretical or abstract jargon we will lose credibility and interest. The medical and lay community does not understand things like ‘The Reiki goes where it needs to go’ and we have to be careful what we speak to and introduce. Instead, we can describe examples of patients or clients who have seen, felt or experienced a benefit from a Reiki session. We can talk about how Reiki eased someone’s pain or lessened a person’s anxiety.
  3. The best way to explain Reiki Practice is to give a short sample session. Let people experience it. Feel and understand it for themselves. Reiki is unique to the individual and I always teach that the best way to understand Reiki Practice is to simply feel it for oneself.

What would you add to this list? What has helped you as a Reiki Nurse or what other suggestions can you come up with to help each other with bringing this beautiful complementary practice to the medical community? 

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